medicare Forms & Publications

Turning 65 & Signing up for Medicare

Turning 65 and becoming eligible for Medicare can have different scenario's which dictate the methods needed or taken to enroll into Medicare,

with some situations not requiring that you even need to enroll.

Here is a great video by Medicare to help you decide to enroll or not.

GO HERE: https://youtu.be/NXRQZgN-L8M

Medicare Handbook explaining in detail, your Medicare Benefits.

GO HERE: https://www.medicare.gov/Pubs/pdf/10050-Medicare-and-You.pdf

If your ready to sign up for Medicare, then scroll down and pick your situation.


Please scroll down for more information & publications.

 EMPLOYED AND STILL WORKING FULL TIME ?   

If you are employed and still covered under your employer group plan, then you are considered covered by credible coverage against Medicare Part B. This means as long as you remain covered by your employers group plan, you are not required to enroll into Medicare Part B.

If you are happy with your employer group plan then we recommend that you wait until you know the date the date that coverage will end BEFORE enrolling into Medicare Part B.

(then do your Medicare enrollment within 30 days prior to your group plan ending) 

Please call us and let us explain your options.

Once your employer group plan ends (*NOT COBRA*), you will then have 60 days to enroll into your Medicare Part B under whats called a "Special Election Period".

You must enroll into Medicare Part B during that time or you will risk being imposed a penalty along with you could possibly be locked out for up to 18 month's.

* Medicare does NOT consider Cobra as credible coverage against Medicare Part B.

 

RETIRED AND NOT DRAWING SOCIAL SECURITY ?

Most people wait on drawing their Social Security Benefits until they are eligible to draw full benefits. However, eligibility date on drawing full Social Security benefits is different than eligibility date to enroll into Medicare.  You can first sign up for Part A and/or Part B during the 7-month period that begins 3 months before the month you turn 65, includes the month you turn 65, and ends 3 months after the month you turn 65. 

Remember, in most cases, if you don’t sign up for Part A (if you have to buy it) and Part B when you’re first eligible, you may have to pay a late enrollment penalty

Enrollment can be done online directly into the Social Security Website and here is some instructions to do so by Social Security.

Sign up online instructions: GO HERE: https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10531.pdf 

Social Security website to sign up. GO HERE: https://www.ssa.gov/ 

OR

CMS Paper Form to sign up for Medicare (Includes instructions

GO HERE: http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/CMS-Forms/CMS-Forms/CMS-Forms-Items/CMS017339.html


RETIRED OR DISABLED AND DRAWING SOCIAL SECURITY ?

If you are already drawing Social Security benefits prior to turning 65 (or drawing Social Security Disability payments and have drawn 24 consecutive monthly payments)

Social Security will send you a letter or card letting you know that they are automatically enrolling you into Medicare Part B as well as give you instructions on how to decline the coverage

if you DO NOT wish to be enrolled.

So short answer in this scenario is, do nothing if you want to be enrolled.

 

Please see other publications on the Medicare.gov website 

relating to "Auto Enrollment"

Late Enrollment into Medicare?

YOU CAN NOT ENROLL ONLINE IF YOU ARE A LATE ENROLLMENT.

If you continued working and covered under your employers health plan or you had other credible coverage when you turned 65, then you probably waited to enroll into Medicare.

If so, then you are considered a "Late Enrollment" and you have special requirements that must be met to enroll into Medicare without being charged a penalty, or to enroll outside the Annual Enrollment Period (January 1st thru March 31st of each year).


1st. You must enroll with 60 days of loosing your credible coverage.

2nd. You must have your employer complete a form for you to submit 

with your enrollment form requesting to be enrolled into Part B.

This form is called " REQUEST FOR EMPLOYMENT INFORMATION "

Print this form (below) and hand it to the human resource department of your employer. 

This needs to be completed by your employer then returned to YOU

GO HERE: https://www.cms.gov/Medicare/CMS-Forms/CMS-Forms/CMS-Forms-Items/CMS009718.html

Once you get the "Employment Information" form back from your employer, submit it with the form below that YOU have completed, requesting to be enrolled into Medicare.

This is the form YOU complete.

GO HERE: http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/CMS-Forms/CMS-Forms/CMS-Forms-Items/CMS017339.html

3rd. Once both forms are completed, make copies of each form, then take both originals and copies to your local Social Security office. Hand in the originals and have them initial AND date stamp the copies as proof that you were there that day and turned in those specific forms.

This is the ONLY goof proof way to ensure your enrollment is not delayed or "Never Received".

This "inconvenience" has saved more than one from getting hit with thousands in Medical Bills just to hear "we never received your Medicare Enrollment Request".

By doing this, you have the proof that Social Security requires, to back date an enrollment that was never processed after it was received. 

Other wise, you will have to wait up to 18 month's to get your Medicare and will be charged a MINIMUM of 10% penalty, and if this is the result of them loosing or never receiving your enrollment, you will regret passing up our instructions due to "inconvenience".


YOU CAN NOT ENROLL ONLINE IF YOU ARE A LATE ENROLLMENT.

Please see other publications on the Medicare.gov website 

relating to late enrollment.

Pay Part A & Part B premiums

Here is the Official CMS (Medicare) web page that explains what your payment options are,

as well as provide you with the forms and instructions on setting those methods of payment up. Please look for additional publications regarding payment methods while you are there.

GO HERE: https://www.medicare.gov/your-medicare-costs/pay-part-a-part-b-premiums

Medicare Premiums: Rules For Higher-Income Beneficiaries & Forms to Appeal

 Rules for higher-income beneficiaries If you have higher income, the law requires an adjustment to your monthly Medicare Part B (medical insurance) and Medicare prescription drug coverage premiums. Higher-income beneficiaries pay higher premiums for Part B and prescription drug coverage. This affects less than five percent of people with Medicare, so most people don’t pay a higher premium. 

Here is one of the publications that explains this along with giving you the amounts of this up charge.

GO HERE: https://www.ssa.gov/pubs/EN-05-10536.pdf

With this being said, YOU HAVE RIGHTS!

You can appeal this increased amounts as described in the link above.

Questions? Call us.

CONDITIONS ON USING LINKS & FORMS FROM THIS WEBSITE

These forms are current as of 09/27/2019.

We do not warrant these forms or publications to be current at the time you download, print, or connect to the associated websites. From time to time, Medicare, Social Security, and CMS will change, update, or remove forms and links on their websites and when doing so will make this information outdated, obsolete, or due to changes, make the links become broken.

If you notice any of this, please let us know immediately so we may make corrections by sending us quick note here: CONTACT FORM

If you would like verification that these forms or links are up to date, 

please call us and we will be happy to help you.

We thank you for visiting our site and hope you found our information and/or support,

to be most helpful.